awkwardsituationist:

photos by nordin seruyan (previously featured) from his flower garden in seruyan, central borneo, indonesia

I swear the spider is posing

(via badass-bharat-deafmuslim-artista)

1,273 notes

ask-an-mra-anything asked: So I'm starting this tumblr called "ask-an-MRA-anything." I see a lot of misunderstanding about what MRAs believe on the internet, so I'd like to answer questions about my positions and stances as an MRA. feel free to ask me anything, thanks!

Not even slightly interested in what you think!

My period isn’t due for another 6 days but I’m getting cramps now

image

image

2 notes

"

loves,

'salt.' kindle is now on sale for a limited time on amazon us/uk/europe for 2.99. for all the folks who don't own a kindle, there are kindle apps available for iPhone/iPad/android and other mobile devices. happy reading, loves :)))

"

(via nayyirahwaheed)

(via nayyirahwaheed)

163 notes

misandry-mermaid:

Pictured above is Boudicca who fought a rebellion against the Romans in 61 AD during the Celtic period, which lasted from around 500 BC to 400 AD. Women in Celtic society were well respected.
They were independent and and there is plenty of evidence for female leaders and warriors during that time.They could own property and had basically had as much power as men did.
What the fuck happened in the next millennium or so is what I want to know
[submitted by Erin]

Christianity?

misandry-mermaid:

Pictured above is Boudicca who fought a rebellion against the Romans in 61 AD during the Celtic period, which lasted from around 500 BC to 400 AD. Women in Celtic society were well respected.

They were independent and and there is plenty of evidence for female leaders and warriors during that time.They could own property and had basically had as much power as men did.

What the fuck happened in the next millennium or so is what I want to know

[submitted by Erin]

Christianity?

250 notes

secretpapi:

I don’t think guantanamo bay should be closed I think they should take out all the “suspected terrorists” and replace them with people who don’t use their turn signals.

34 notes

FOR SCIENCE - Can You Roll Your Tongue?

annikath:

Can you roll your tongue like this? image
If you CAN, then please REBLOG.
This is for serious science! because I have an assignment in my biology class to do a survey on how many people can or cannot roll their tongues.
If you CANNOT roll your tongue like that, then please FAVOURITE this post!
you can de-favourite the post or delete it from your blog in about two weeks if you desire to do so, but I plead you to take part in this survey of serious sience! thank

(via karnythia)

timrous-beastie:

inlovewithjaymcguiness-tw:

am-buh:

tangerinewerewolves:

mancwanderer:

I can think of a tumblr that should really really RB

G’wan Ed.

For Politics we met with our MP Stephen Doughty (who’s one of the Labour Whip’s…he basically makes sure everyone in Labour doesn’t break rules and votes right and shii) and he actually told us how during Prime Minister Question Time (which is what’s happening here) back bench Conservative MP’s have a tendency to make very sexist actions when female MP’s try to talk because they know the cameras can’t see them.

These are grown men who we’ve entrusted to run our country and they make boob signs when women try to speak and actually do their job.

That last comment though…

(via theweightofjupiter)

2,352 notes

"I wish that I could, but I’m so close to finishing season one of ‘Damages’, and I made this, like, amazing cashew stir-fry for the week, so I’m actually pretty booked."

(Source: alanabloom, via lotsalipstick)

2,942 notes

yunglapras:

stop painting sex as liberation

sex is not a universal want or need

it is not the form of my liberation 

from anything

(via oiseau-du-malheur)

4,998 notes

actegratuit:

Khattin Valery

(via toutes-choses-egales)

9,910 notes

naturalsceneries:

At the foot of a giant dune, in the Namib Desert  photo by Marina Sorokina

naturalsceneries:

At the foot of a giant dune, in the Namib Desert photo by Marina Sorokina

(via frank-e-shadow-tongue)

59 notes

freesyria:

Syria: ‘Never Again’ Is Now.

Twenty years ago this week the Rwandan genocide began.
Since then we’ve filled museums with haunting relics, held memorials remembering the hundreds of thousands of victims senselessly slaughtered, and solemnly declared the words, “never again” from podiums throughout the world.
We’ve said those words so many times.
"Never again."
We’ll never let it happen again. We’ll never stand by while innocent women, men, and children are slaughtered, hacked to death in their homes, in schools, in places of worship, burned to death, bludgeoned to death, shot. We’ll never let it happen again.
But how can we even say those words today, how can we utter those words on this solemn anniversary?
We’re saying “never again” as we watch a genocide unfold in real time in Syria.
"Never again."
I thought of these words during a recent visit to the Syrian border, where I met victims who had been pulled from the wreckage of barrel bomb attacks and rushed to a Syrian border hospital. Here, children lie paralyzed in rows of beds, their tiny spines punctured by a sniper’s gun.
Increasing evidence now shows that Assad regime snipers target children and pregnant women in a sick war game, awarding with cigarettes the snipers who hit their civilian targets. “Deliberate,” and “hell beyond hell” is how Dr. David Nott, a British surgeon, described the injuries he witnessed at a Syrian hospital.
But where is our outrage? We’re mouthing “never again” while silently regarding the plight of an entire generation of Syria’s children.
Within the last two years, the Assad regime has incorporated “barrel bombs” into the arsenal of terror weapons used against the civilian population. Packed with TNT and shrapnel, the bombs are frequently dropped by helicopters on neighborhoods full of women and children.
One woman I visited at a hospital on the Syrian border described hearing the sound of a helicopter rotor and rushing to seek cover with her family. In seconds she saw limbs flying through the air as shrapnel from the bomb carved its bloody path through the bodies of her mother, sister, and five small nephews. When the attack was over, she looked down and realized one of her own legs had been severed. In the distance she could hear more helicopters on the approach.
There wasn’t enough time to bury her family members that day, she told me. With her father’s help, she was able to grab only the school photos of her nephews, her last remaining relic of the family she had lost so suddenly.
That day at the hospital she carefully showed me these photos, describing how each one had been killed. “This one was beheaded,” she told me, pointing to a photo of her five-year-old nephew. She and her father were the only surviving members of her family. They fled across the border.
Bloodied bodies hacked to pieces whether by Assad’s shrapnel or the machetes of the Hutu militia demonstrate an unspeakable horror that occurred in Rwanda twenty years ago and is unfolding today across Syria.
Technological advancements and social media prevalence have ensured that we have more access to the Syrian crisis than has ever been possible in a war zone. Yet we have somehow become immune to the images on our screens.
Today, we’re all remembering the Rwandan genocide — as well we should. But we can’t spend all of our time looking back while we’re saying “never again.” We can’t say “never again” today while we silently allow cruelty to continue in another corner of the world.
Today I hope that the Rwandan genocide anniversary serves as a catalyst for our action, spurring us to shatter our silence, and compelling us to act.
Politicians and government leaders often excuse their inaction on Syria with words like “complicated.” And we know that many government leaders once felt the same way about Rwanda.
When I traveled to the Syrian border I found a different reality. Complications exist, yes, but the reality of human suffering on this scale demands a very simple response: action. Truly, no setting wherein human beings are being bombed, shot, gassed, and chopped into pieces en masse should ever be considered too complicated for our intervention.
Instead of a complicated mess on the Syrian border, I found people just like you and me, who need people just like you and me. Today, I hope the solemn anniversary of the Rwandan genocide serves as a catalyst for us to shatter the silence on Syria, compelling us to take real action to end this horror.
If we are going to use the words “never again,” we must back them up with our action.
"Never again" is now.


SOURCE.

freesyria:

Syria: ‘Never Again’ Is Now.

Twenty years ago this week the Rwandan genocide began.

Since then we’ve filled museums with haunting relics, held memorials remembering the hundreds of thousands of victims senselessly slaughtered, and solemnly declared the words, “never again” from podiums throughout the world.

We’ve said those words so many times.

"Never again."

We’ll never let it happen again. We’ll never stand by while innocent women, men, and children are slaughtered, hacked to death in their homes, in schools, in places of worship, burned to death, bludgeoned to death, shot. We’ll never let it happen again.

But how can we even say those words today, how can we utter those words on this solemn anniversary?

We’re saying “never again” as we watch a genocide unfold in real time in Syria.

"Never again."

I thought of these words during a recent visit to the Syrian border, where I met victims who had been pulled from the wreckage of barrel bomb attacks and rushed to a Syrian border hospital. Here, children lie paralyzed in rows of beds, their tiny spines punctured by a sniper’s gun.

Increasing evidence now shows that Assad regime snipers target children and pregnant women in a sick war game, awarding with cigarettes the snipers who hit their civilian targets. “Deliberate,” and “hell beyond hell” is how Dr. David Nott, a British surgeon, described the injuries he witnessed at a Syrian hospital.

But where is our outrage? We’re mouthing “never again” while silently regarding the plight of an entire generation of Syria’s children.

Within the last two years, the Assad regime has incorporated “barrel bombs” into the arsenal of terror weapons used against the civilian population. Packed with TNT and shrapnel, the bombs are frequently dropped by helicopters on neighborhoods full of women and children.

One woman I visited at a hospital on the Syrian border described hearing the sound of a helicopter rotor and rushing to seek cover with her family. In seconds she saw limbs flying through the air as shrapnel from the bomb carved its bloody path through the bodies of her mother, sister, and five small nephews. When the attack was over, she looked down and realized one of her own legs had been severed. In the distance she could hear more helicopters on the approach.

There wasn’t enough time to bury her family members that day, she told me. With her father’s help, she was able to grab only the school photos of her nephews, her last remaining relic of the family she had lost so suddenly.

That day at the hospital she carefully showed me these photos, describing how each one had been killed. “This one was beheaded,” she told me, pointing to a photo of her five-year-old nephew. She and her father were the only surviving members of her family. They fled across the border.

Bloodied bodies hacked to pieces whether by Assad’s shrapnel or the machetes of the Hutu militia demonstrate an unspeakable horror that occurred in Rwanda twenty years ago and is unfolding today across Syria.

Technological advancements and social media prevalence have ensured that we have more access to the Syrian crisis than has ever been possible in a war zone. Yet we have somehow become immune to the images on our screens.

Today, we’re all remembering the Rwandan genocide — as well we should. But we can’t spend all of our time looking back while we’re saying “never again.” We can’t say “never again” today while we silently allow cruelty to continue in another corner of the world.

Today I hope that the Rwandan genocide anniversary serves as a catalyst for our action, spurring us to shatter our silence, and compelling us to act.

Politicians and government leaders often excuse their inaction on Syria with words like “complicated.” And we know that many government leaders once felt the same way about Rwanda.

When I traveled to the Syrian border I found a different reality. Complications exist, yes, but the reality of human suffering on this scale demands a very simple response: action. Truly, no setting wherein human beings are being bombed, shot, gassed, and chopped into pieces en masse should ever be considered too complicated for our intervention.

Instead of a complicated mess on the Syrian border, I found people just like you and me, who need people just like you and me. Today, I hope the solemn anniversary of the Rwandan genocide serves as a catalyst for us to shatter the silence on Syria, compelling us to take real action to end this horror.

If we are going to use the words “never again,” we must back them up with our action.

"Never again" is now.

SOURCE.

(via libyanforsyria)

20 notes

qamaranwzaytoun:

"Do you remember when we were people? Homs, do you remember it?"

qamaranwzaytoun:

"Do you remember when we were people? Homs, do you remember it?"

(Source: sakkeh3arja, via libyanforsyria)

2,232 notes

river-temz asked: No offense to the individual travelling to Nairobi, but those service trips to Africa, are not leaving any long-term benefits or sustainable attributes to a poverty stricken region. A school will not feed any child for 50+ years and bring economy and wealth to the area where it's needed. But go ahead and build your school,would look great on your Résumé. Because I've argued with an ignorant ass racist that told me he built a school in Ethiopia, so I had to give him a pat on the back.

rlossehelin:

whitepeoplesaidwhat:

-

One could say something similar happens in Latin America, or at least Paraguay. I have to admit I met some nice people doing an exchange in the countryside that at least learned our local languages and stuff… but then I met others that only smoked pod all the time. And they have the tendency to make joke of completely inappropriate stuff. For example… whenever there is a blond child in the street, there are called Peace Corps’s kids. Because in some cases they are, because Peace Corp guys come, find a pretty girl and they have a short romance with an “exotic girl” and then they leave but they leave a “remembrance” behind. If I am not mistaken, single mothers are one of the most common form of families in this country, and guys abandoning their families is a national problem. This country is very chauvinistic still and a girl is usually blamed for “letting herself become pregnant” and weird shit like that. 

One day I remember hearing one Peace Corp guy saying that he wanted to “improve the race” by sleeping with a local girl. Sadly, I could only look at him disapprovingly and nothing useful came to mind. Then he said it was “just a joke”. No, dude, it is not a joke. The fact that he was white and thought that he could improve the other “race” was not something he came up on his own. Locally many people think that it is true, that one can improve by “mixing” with a wither person.

Apart from that… those who come with religion in their mind aren’t always bad… but the big issue is that if they go to the local indigenous communities then one can’t expect that these missionaries will respect the local belief and traditions of these communities.  A couple of years ago, a Spanish priest - that usually does a fantastic job taking care of ill and dying people - wrote in a newspaper about the guaranies and the “Land without evil”. The idea of the Land without evil is an utopia, a land the guaranies have been looking for ages and it is believed that is that what made them nomads. Well… this priest wrote that the guaranies found that land without evil the day they met the Spanish people, that brought Christ with them. The problem is, as you may know, that religion wasn’t the only thing the Spanish brought with them. Nope, they brought disease, slavery, torture, etc. I don’t need to expand on this, it is known.  I was not pleasantly surprised to find out that Spanish institution still send and support nouns and priest with the intention of convert indigenous people to a foreign religion. If someone wants to convert to a religion then it’s fine. The problem, I think, is that indigenous are still not respected or seen as capable and in some cases as people, at all. Their religion or traditions are not seen as valid. Therefore, I think that is not right to try and convert them if they have barely have time to recover their identities, specially after the dictatorship in the 70’s. I know that some priests have helped some indigenous people a great deal, by writing the language down and protecting them from Bandeirantes, but in many cases these interactions don’t seem to be so favorable for indigenous people. I mean, equating the Fire god to the devil…  what is that? I think it erases cultural diversity.

Also about projects and donations… there are so many machines that were donated to the University that only went there to rot. Because, surprise!, no one knew how to use them.  

Maybe it would be better to send locals to learn something outside, but maybe, just maybe, we should start looking at this South-South collaboration idea more seriously.

233 notes